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Pushing Hands: The Application of T’ai Chi Ch’uan

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Left: A Primary "Double Hands Method"
Right: Wu Style's "Cloud Hands" (Fast Set)

Initially, T’ai Chi’s Pushing Hands can be both insightful and a joy to learn. However, mastering and applying it in self-defense situations can take additional time to assimilate over most other martial arts’ particular techniques. That could be why more and more T’ai Chi practitioners choose to use external means or obvious tactics, instead of the resiliency and subtleties derived from T’ai Chi’s Push Hands. On the left is the basic double-hands method of Wu Style’s Pushing Hands practice. On the right, lightness (cultivated through Push Hands training) is utilized to neutralize an attempt at a standing arm bar (and ensuing arm drag), and then, in turn, the opponent’s grasp of the defender’s arm is used as both an entry and a pivot point to redirect the opponent’s energy and force. While T’ai Chi’s Push Hands may take a lifetime to master, the journey along the way offers many personal rewards.

Wu Power Train

Explore Ma Yueh Liang and Wu Ying Hua, Chi Kung (Qigong), , and a Biography of Jiang Rong Qiao

We’ve recently updated the following pages :
Yi Quan, Liangong, and Applications of the Mother Palms

 

The T’ai Chi Power Combo! Our T’ai Chi Power Combo combines Two Complete Video Series in One: The Power Push Hands Video Series (Single Hands, Double Hands, Moving Push Hands, and Self-Defense Concepts) with The Wu T’ai Chi Power Training Video Series (includes 3 Wu Style T’ai Chi Inner Door Sets, Hand and Spear Power Cultivation, Deriving Power from Form’s Practice, and Integrating Power in Push Hands)

Swimming Dragon Video

 

Our Chi Kung Duo

We have combined two of our best stand alone Chi Kung instructional videos to create the Chi Kung Duo (Ancient vs. Modern). The Swimming Dragon Chi Kung, is thought to have originated with the Yellow Emperor, and, with one look at its shapes and simplicity of movements (based on the Five Elemental Phases) it's easy to conclude that this may very likely be something special that has survived the ages-not to mention the fact that some people swear by the wonders it does for their spine and posture. The Soaring Crane Chi Kung was created by Zhao Jin Xiang in the 1970s, and is one of the most popular forms of Chi Kung the world over. With its specific focus on therapeutic points, patience, and stillness in movement, it rivals the chi cultivation sets of the ancients. The unique "sixth section" (or, Advanced Meditation) is a marvel amongst any and all Chi Kung practices. While we don't advocate practicing two types of Chi Kung at the same time, these two popular and useful forms of Chi Kung practice, that we have combined in the "Chi Kung Duo" are certainly worth utilizing to compare, contrast, and ultimately cultivate.